Applied Genetic Technologies opens office in Cambridge, Mass.

Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC), a biotechnology company conducting human clinical trials for the treatment of rare eye diseases, announced the opening of a new Cambridge, Massachusetts, office facility from company headquarters in Gainesville, Florida, on Thursday.


Applied Genetic Technologies opens office in Cambridge, Mass.  

Applied Genetic Technologies Corporation (AGTC), a biotechnology company conducting human clinical trials for the treatment of rare eye diseases, announced the opening of a new Cambridge, Massachusetts, office facility from company headquarters in Gainesville, Florida, on Thursday.

The new facility at One Kendall Square, to be led by CBO Stephen Potter and CSO Mark Shearman, will focus on pharmacology, business development and research and development. AGTC CEO Sue Washer has clarified the firm’s need to establish a Cambridge base, as the city has evolved into a global life sciences cluster.

"With close proximity to leading life science and medical innovators, world-class academic research centers and a deep talent pool, having a presence in Cambridge will be beneficial to fostering AGTC's ongoing business and clinical development activities,” Washer said.

AGTC’s product suite includes a set of ophthalmology development programs for four ocular disorders as well as other conditions. The firm targets its choices to develop product candidates, favoring therapies with indications of unmet medical need, clinical feasibility and commercial potential.

The clinical-stage biotechnology company uses its proprietary gene therapy platform to develop products designed to transform the lives of patients with severe diseases in ophthalmology. AGTC has a robust intellectual property portfolio as well as expertise in gene therapy product design.

AGTC's lead product candidates focus on X-linked retinoschisis and retinitis pigmentosa, and achromatopsia, inherited orphan diseases of the eye caused by single gene mutations in that significantly affect visual function and currently lack effective medical treatments.

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