Suspect held in Florida Holocaust Museum break-in

Thanks to state-of-the-art security systems, little was disturbed and no damage occurred after an intruder broke into the Florida Holocaust Museum (FHM) in St. Petersburg on Sunday, with the suspect being taken into custody within minutes of the incident.


Thanks to state-of-the-art security systems, little was disturbed and no damage occurred after an intruder broke into the Florida Holocaust Museum (FHM) in St. Petersburg on Sunday, with the suspect being taken into custody within minutes of the incident.

FHM Executive Director Elizabeth Gelman credited financial support from federal sources that allowed the museum to upgrade its security systems.

"In the past few years, local grants from Homeland Security have allowed us to begin upgrading our security systems," Gelman said. "Those security measures – and the quick response from the St. Petersburg police – assisted in keeping damage to the minimum."

The Florida Holocaust Museum is one of the largest Holocaust museums in the United States and one of three that are nationally accredited. It preserves the legacy of millions who died or suffered in the Holocaust during World War II.

"At this time, no one seems to know why the man wanted to get into the museum," Gelman said. "We will continue to work hard to protect our important collection as well as our visitors and staff."

The FHM arose from the experiences of Nazi Germany survivor and St. Petersburg businessman and philanthropist Walter Loebenberg. It strives to educate individuals of all backgrounds about the dignity and value of human life in a widespread effort to avert genocide in the future.

 



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